Orchard On the Blue Ridge

Orchard on the  BlueRidge

Orchard On the Blue Ridge

Pastel, 12” x 9”
Private collection

Dusk On the Harbor

Dusk on the Harbor

Dusk On the Harbor

Pastel, 12” x 9”
Private collection

Horse Country

Horse Country

To inquire about purchasing a print,
contact the artist.

Horse Country

Acrylic on canvas, 24” x 18”
Private collection, Mr. and Mrs. Nick Kavadellas

Horses remain for many a reminder and connection to a rural existence now missing in many parts of the country. These three beauties largely ignored me, only one bothering to raise its head to note my presence.

Looking North: December Morning

December Morning

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contact the artist.

Looking North: December Morning

acrylic on canvas, 48” x 24”

Highway 20 runs east along a ridge just outside of Canton, offering glimpses of the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The Blue Ridge makes up the southernmost section of the Appalachians, one of the oldest mountain ranges in the world. Once as craggy as the Himalayas, the Appalachians have been worn to gentle nubs by a half billion years of rain and wind.

Southern winters can be mild. By the time I saw this view, the morning sun had burned away the frost in on the fields. It lingered only in the blue- shadowed hollows. The chimney smoke alone betrays the temperature.
Travels on Highway 20 – a backcountry road with a surprising history.
Read the article from The Olde Town Gazette
[link to pdf on the Bookstore tab]

The Red Barn

The Red Barn

Purchase a custom print on canvas through Fine Art America. Framing available.

For custom size and artist-brushed texture, contact the artist.
In stock at the studio, 5″ x 7″  signed print, with hand-crafted gold frame:
$95.
 

The Red Barn

Acrylic on canvas, 22” x 28”
Private collection

“We here in America don’t have any antiquity, so for us there is only 18th and 19th century rural nostalgia. It was then we had our heroic age, and a…barn is to us as a Greek temple was to Poussin, a symbol of a whole tradition, laden with all kinds of good associations.”

– Wolfe Kahn

I grew up in the rural Midwest, and barns dotted every road I ever traveled in my childhood. They haunt my memories, and appear in paintings from every decade of my life. This one resides in the Hickory Flat area of Cherokee County, and she is every bit as beautiful as I have portrayed her, spreading her wings beside a serene pond of blue.

Like Wolfe Kahn, I can’t think of an element in the American landscape that speaks more to our heritage. Barns can be found in every part of our country, and represent the American movement across the continent.

In The Red Barn, I arched the sky high over the barn to show the firmament, anchoring the barn to both earth and heaven, like the temple Kahn refers to. The earth yields the harvest, heaven yields the sun and rain, and both make the harvest bountiful. The changing sky hints at the winter to come.

Midwinter: The Barn at Hickory Flat

Barn at Hickory Flats

Purchase a custom print on canvas through Fine Art America. Framing available.

For custom size and artist-brushed texture, contact the artist.
In stock at the studio, 12″ x 9″  signed print, framed:
$150.
 

Midwinter: The Barn at Hickory Flat

Acrylic on canvas, 12” x 9”
Private collection, Mr. and Mrs. Don Boyee

This painting portrays a beautiful little barn tucked just off East Cherokee Road. In this work, I’ve distilled the scene to its essence; a glowing sky, a simple barn, the utter stillness of a midwinter sunset. This distillation is the critical step that transforms an image from simply a pleasant picture into that elusive thing we call Art.

As an artist matures, the distilling process brings about a painting style as unique as any signature. When I have completed a piece of art, I find that what often emanates from the canvas is a kind of radiant peacefulness that seems to be part of my best work.

The Three Elders

The Three Elders

 

Purchase
a custom print on canvas through Fine Art America. Framing available.

The Three Elders

Acrylic on watercolor canvas, 9” x 12”
Private collection, Mr. and Mrs. Mitch Branham
Woodstock, Georgia

This painting combines expressive Asian brush-work with the surprising reversal of transparent trees and opaque sky, its soft trees a nod to pre-Impressionist Camille Corot. In the Asian tradition, the painting utilizes pure black, breaking one of the “rules” commonly expressed in contemporary art-making, “steer clear of pure black.”

The painting is also a portrait. These three ancient trees reside on Elm Street in downtown Woodstock, and represent perhaps the town’s last original residents. The painting faithfully records the unique shape and almost human character of each. Having grown old together, the three display a lovely give-and-take as complementary as that of any human friendship.