Fire and Water

Fire and Water med Ann's rev (2)

“Fire and Water” – click on painting for enlarged detail and color

Purchase a print online through Fine Art America. Range of sizes and frame options.

 
For a canvas print with a hand painted brush texture simulating the original, contact the artist.
In the studio, 36″ x 24″  signed print, $325.

 

Fire and Water

Oil on canvas, 36” x 24”
Private collection

It’s safe to say the Gresham Mill at Sixes Road has been the subject of more paintings and photographs than any other landmark in Cherokee County. In high summer, 2003, I added my own version. I visited the mill in early morning, and captured the mists and morning sunlight that softened the heavy blanket of green that Georgia wears in the summer.

But autumn is my favorite season in Georgia, so I was thrilled when I was approached by a couple celebrating their fortieth anniversary: they wanted a painting of the mill in autumn.

pen and ink finished revIt was still early summer when I visited the Mill once again to make preliminary black and white sketches, as I do for major works. Working on the play of lights and shadows without the distraction of color, I can examine the “bones” of the scene. I sat outside for a while watching the early morning light move across the eastern face of the mill. I tried to discern how the scene made me feel—what is was “communicating.” This is one of the most important but perhaps least understood aspects of what an artist does. The undercurrents of emotion that a scene evokes are the submerged text that must be manifested in the painting. This is what separates the art from a photo.

As fall came to Georgia and the colors reached their height, I returned twice to the scene. The transformation wrought by color heightened what I had seen in summer—the mill was almost shrouded by trees, cast in shadow and embedded in the hillside. The movement of the bright foliage around it was like sheets of fire cascading down the hillside, finally extinguishing themselves on the rocks amongst the cool shadows of the stream. I made a color study in pastels.

Mill pastel studyIn looking at the final painting, you can see how the artist’s vision differs from the initial color rendering. The final work of art matches the vision in my mind’s eye:, where it seemed to me as I looked upon this scene, I was seeing the last glowing flames of life warming the Mill before the slumber of cold winter.

 

A Perfect Day (Bridge Mill golf course)

A Perfect Day

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A Perfect Day, Bridge Mill

Acrylic on canvas, 16” x 12”

The water acts like a mirror in this morning scene at the entrance of the Bridge Mill golf course.

Brick Mill Falls

Brick Mill Falls
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Brick Mill Falls

Acrylic on canvas, 18” x 24”

The painting depicts a picturesque waterfall on Scott Mill Creek, part of the Etowah River system. Its appearance makes for a beautiful surprise at the end of Brick Mill Road. The morning I first saw these falls, the colors really were this intense – blue rocks and pink dawn.

Over the Water (Towne Lake Hills golf course)

Over the Water

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Over the Water, Towne Lake Hills

Acrylic on canvas, 16” x 12”

Another painting in a series depicting Cherokee County golf courses. The long shadows of the trees echo the flight of the ball over the water in this showcase hole at the Towne Lake Hills course.

Twilight Comes (Eagle Watch, 17th hole)

Twilight Comes

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Twilight Comes, Eagle Watch

Acrylic on canvas, 16” x 12”

Another painting in a series depicting Cherokee County golf courses. The focus of this painting is the stillness of the green as the viewer approaches this hole near the end of the course.

The painting depicts the seventeenth hole at Eagle Watch Golf Course.

Racing the Storm (Eagle Watch, 16th hole)

Racing the Storm

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Racing the Storm, Eagle Watch

Acrylic on canvas, 16” x 12”

Although this is not a conventional golf scene, it is one of my favorites in a series of Cherokee County golf courses I executed with acrylic paint on watercolor canvas. With this medium, the color and durability of acrylic paint is combined with the delicate wash effects of the more transient watercolor paints.

The painting depicts the sixteenth hole at Eagle Watch Golf Course.

 

Under the Sky (Bradshaw Farm)

Under the Sky

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Under the Sky, Bradshaw Farms

Acrylic on canvas, 16” x 12”
Private collection, Mr. and Mrs. Ron Richmond

The distinctive red clubhouse of the Bradshaw Farms golf course evokes the historic barn structure of the Bradshaw family acreage. Here it catches the light of the sun, low on the horizon, as it shadows the eighteenth hole below.

 

Sunday Morning (Eagle Watch, first hole)

Sunday Morning

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Sunday Morning

Acrylic on canvas, 24” x 30”

Golfers often exhibit a religious fervor about the game of golf. Indeed a golf course fairway, with its columns of trees on either side, and the vault of the sky above, resembles a kind of outdoor cathedral. And the game itself contains an element of ritual and meditative concentration often found in spiritual practices.

My husband likes to call golf courses the “American version of a Zen Garden.”

The painting depicts the first tee at Eagle Watch Golf Course.

Dusk, The Gathering (Elm Street Cultural Arts Village)

Dusk, the Gathering

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a custom print on canvas through Fine Art America. Framing available.
Dusk, the Gathering

Oil on canvas, 30” x 48”
Private collection, Mr. and Mrs. David Duckworth

These ancient trees can be found in downtown Woodstock Georgia, where they stand like a trio of guardians, marking the future location of a new arts center, the Elm Street cultural Arts Village.

In this painting, you see the metamorphosis wrought by color on a daylight scene I first depicted in “The Three elders. This work casts the magic shroud of sunset over the gathering of old trees. It evokes for me the otherworldly air of giants, or perhaps Druids, from half-remembered tales of long ago.

In the End (Franklin-Creighton Gold Mine)

In the End

 

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a custom print on canvas through Fine Art America. Framing available.
In the End

Oil on canvas, 28” x 22”
Private collection, Mr. and Mrs. Jason Howey

In this painting of the Shingle House, the physical shapes of the landscape went through the refiner’s fire of my inner eye, yielding a fantastical red sky that, nevertheless, seems as real to me as any in the “real” world.

Yet I struggled through many studies and small paintings, like the one you see on the right, before I could make that vivid mental image come to life in a painting. I worried that the red sky would be “too much” for a successful painting, and I experimented with numerous “watered down” versions like the one above. Finally, my friend, master landscape artist Marsha Savage, looked at my sketches and said, “For Pete’s sake, if you see a red sky, paint a red sky.”

The most challenging task of the artist is learning to trust one’s vision – that inner vision that, until translated through the medium of art, is seen and perceived in the mind of the artist alone.